Topics for Specific Users

These titles address issues of interest to specific populations:

Adjunct Faculty

Virginia Bianco-Mathis and Neal Chalofsky, The Adjunct Faculty Handbook
Colleges and universities throughout the world are relying increasingly on part-time and adjunct faculty to meet teaching needs. Complete with checklists, sample syllabi, evaluation forms and case studies, this handbook provides administrators and full- and part-time faculty with a much-needed, practical resource for helping adjuncts teach as effectively as possible. Topics covered include: course planning, teaching strategies, cooperative learning, student evaluation, and professional development.

Donald. A. Greive, A Handbook for Adjunct/Part-Time Faculty and Teachers of Adults
This book is designed to help adjuncts tackle the day-to-day problems associated with teaching part-time. From course planning to teaching adult students, this book offers practical suggestions, strategies, and advice.

Richard E. Lyons, Best Practices for Supporting Adjunct Faculty
Best Practices for Supporting Adjunct Faculty showcases proven initiatives at a variety of institutional types—two- and four-year, public and private—that help achieve the needs of adjunct instructors, while increasing their effectiveness within institutions’ existing delivery systems.

Richard E. Lyons, Marcella L. Kysilka, and George E. Pawlas. The Adjunct Professor’s Guide to Success: Surviving and Thriving in the College Classroom
The Adjunct Professor’s Guide to Success begins by providing guidance to those seeking an initial teaching assignment. It then addresses the issues that will be faced: becoming oriented to the institution, planning the course, conducting an effective first class meeting, etc. The book concludes with chapters on self-evaluation techniques for building a part-time career in academe.

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Resources for and about Graduate Students and Teaching Assistants

R. R. Allen and Theodore Roeter, Teaching Assistant Strategies: An Introduction to College Teaching
This guide shows you how to find a comfortable and effective teaching style; how to relate to students, course directors, and support staff; how to plan creative and effective instructional units; how to create a positive atmosphere in the classroom; how to make lectures and class presentations interesting and relevant; how to conduct productive class discussions; how to conduct skill development courses effectively; and how to measure and evaluate student progress.

Sandra L. Barnes, On The Market: Strategies for a Successful Academic Job Search
This book examines professional and personal issues every candidate should think about before entering or re-entering the job market, or when considering, accepting, or rejecting a position. Included are suggestions, practical strategies, “quick lists,” publishing strategies, and advice from faculty, as well as observations and ideas developed during the author’s employment search process.

Laura L. B. Border, ed., Mapping the Range of Graduate Student Professional Development
This edited book series serves as a guide to the study of improved training, employment and administration of graduate and professional student development programs. Topics include TA training, orientation, mentoring, pedagogy courses, teaching certificates, and international GTA development.

Steven M. Cahn, From Student to Scholar: A Candid Guide to Becoming a Professor
Cahn’s advice on the professorial life covers an extensive range of critical issues: how to plan, complete, and defend a dissertation; how to navigate a job interview; how to improve teaching performance; how to prepare and publish research; how to develop a professional network; and how to garner support for tenure. He deals with such hurdles as a difficult dissertation advisor, problematic colleagues, and the pressures of the tenure clock. Whether you are beginning graduate study, hoping to secure an academic position, or striving to build a professorial career, Cahn’s insights are invaluable to traversing the thickets of academia.

Kenneth A. Feldman and Michael B. Paulsen, Teaching and Learning in the College Classroom, 2nd ed.
This is a broad-based reader designed to increase the awareness and understanding of the most important issues, practices and research associated with the principles of effective teaching and learning in the college classroom. This book should serve as a resource for graduate students, faculty members, administrators, and any others with an interest in higher education.

Heather Fry, Steve Ketteridge, and Stephanie Marshall (eds.), A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: Enhancing Academic Practice, 3rd ed.
This book focuses on developing professional academic skills for teaching. Dealing with the rapid expansion of the use of technology in higher education and widening student diversity, this fully updated and expanded edition includes new material on, the example, e-learning, lecturing to large groups, formative and summative assessment, and supervising research students.

Frank F. Furstenberg, Behind the Academic Curtain: How to Find Success and Happiness with a Ph.D.
Furstenberg offers a clear and user-friendly map to the sometimes overwhelming maze that is life with a Ph.D. From working through graduate school to earning tenure to easing into retirement, from committee work to research funding to managing teaching loads, he illuminates all the challenges and opportunities that define a scholarly life, whether inside or outside of academia. Comprehensive and practical, it is an essential companion for any scholar, at any stage of his or her career.

John A. Goldsmith, John Komlos, and Penny Schine Gold, The Chicago Guide to Your Academic Career: A Portable Mentor for Scholars from Graduate School through Tenure
In this guide, three distinguished scholars—with more than 75 years of combined teaching experience—talk openly about what’s good and what’s not so good about academia, as a place to work and as a way of life. Written as an informal conversation among colleagues, the book is packed with inside information about finding a mentor, making it through the dissertation, getting a job, obtaining tenure, and more.

Paul Gray and David E. Drew, What They Didn’t Teach You in Graduate School: 199 Helpful Hints for Success in Your Academic Career
What is academic life like? How do you discover its tacit rules? Develop the habits and networks needed for success? What issues will you encounter if you’re a person of color, or a woman? How is higher education changing? In 199 succinct, and often humorous but seriously practical hints, Gray and Drew share their combined experience of many years as faculty and (recovering) administrators to offer insider advice—the kind that’s rarely taught or even talked about in graduate school.

Kathryn Hume, Surviving Your Academic Job Hunt: Advice for Humanities PhDs
This book shows job hunters how to train themselves to succeed in the humanities job market. They can study examples of the documents and work up answers to the questions posed in phone, conference, and campus interviews. They will also learn about bargaining for items such as subsidies, databases, and start-up packages.

Karen Kelsky, The Professor is In: The Essential Guide to Turning Your Ph.D. into a Job
Karen Kelsky is a former tenured profesor and department head with fifteen years of experience at major research institutions. She is the most widely recognized expert on Ph.D. professionalization advice and job-market training, and this book compiles all her best advice into a guide that addreses the most important issues facing Ph.D.’s.

James M. Lang, Life on the Tenure Track: Lessons from the First Year
In this fast-paced and lively account of his first year as an Assistant Professor, Lang asks the questions that confront every new faculty member: Will my students like me? Will my teaching schedule allow me time to do research and write? Is anyone still awake in the back row? Lang shares his moments of confusion, frustration, even elation—as well as his insights into the lives and working conditions of faculty in higher education today.

Catherine Ross and Jane Dunphy, Strategies for Teaching Assistant and International Teaching Assistant Development: Beyond Micro Teaching
Written for anyone who works with graduate students to support their teaching efforts in American research universities, this book draws on the extensive experience of professional educators who represent a variety of programs throughout the United States. They understand the common constraints of many TA development classes, workshops, and programs, as well as the need for motivating and sophisticated techniques that are, at the same time, practical and focused.

Tonette Rocco, Tim Hatcher, and Associates, The Handbook of Scholarly Writing and Publishing
The Handbook of Scholarly Writing and Publishing is a groundbreaking resource that offers emerging and experienced scholars from all disciplines a comprehensive review of the essential elements needed to craft scholarly papers and other writing suitable for submission to academic journals. The authors discuss the components of different types of manuscripts, explain the submission process, and offer readers suggestions for working with editors and coauthors, dealing with rejection, and rewriting and resubmitting their work. They include advice for developing quality writing skills, outline the fundamentals of a good review, and offer guidance for becoming an excellent manuscript reviewer.

Robert Rotenberg, The Art & Craft of College Teaching: A Guide for New Professors & Graduate Students
This book provides a hands-on, quick-start guide to the complexities of the college classroom for instructors in their first five years of teaching independently. The chapters survey the existing literature on how to effectively teach young adults, offering specific solutions to the most commonly faced classroom dilemmas.

Paul J. Silvia, How to Write a Lot
In this practical, lighthearted, and encouraging book, Paul J. Silvia explains that writing productively does not require innate skills or special traits but specific tactics and actions. Drawing examples from his own field of psychology, he shows readers how to overcome motivational roadblocks and become prolific without sacrificing evenings, weekends, and vacations. After describing strategies for writing productively, the author gives detailed advice from the trenches on how to write, submit, revise, and resubmit articles; how to improve writing quality; and how to write and publish academic work.

Paul Silvia, Write It Up: Practical Strategies for Writing and Publishing Journal Articles
Your academic writing will be more influential if you approach it reflectively and strategically. Based on his experience as an author, journal editor, and reviewer, Paul Silvia offers sage and witty advice on problems like picking journals; cultivating the right tone and style for your article; managing collaborative projects and coauthors; crafting effective Introduction, Method, Results, and Discussion sections; and submitting and resubmitting papers to journals. This book is for anyone writing an empirical article in APA Style, from beginners facing their first article to old dogs looking for new writing strategies.

Emily Toth, Ms. Mentor’s Impeccable Advice for Women in Academia
Ms. Mentor’s readers will find answers to the secret queries they were afraid to ask anyone else. They’ll discover what it really takes to get tenure; what to wear to academic occasions; when to snicker, when to hide, what to eat, and when to sue. They’ll find out how to get firmly planted in the rich red earth of tenure.

Emily Toth, Ms. Mentor’s New and Ever More Impeccable Advice for Women and men in Academia
From the ivory tower that affords her an unparalleled view of the academic landscape, Ms. Mentor dispenses her perfect wisdom to the huddled masses of professorial newbies, hardbitten oldies, and anxious midcareerists. She gives etiquette lessons to academic couples and the tough-talking low-down on adjunct positions. She tells you what to wear, how to make yourself popular, and how to decode academic language.

Julia Miller Vick and Jennifer S. Furlong, The Academic Job Search Handbook, 4th ed.
This book provides an overview of the hiring process and a timetable for applying for academic positions. It also gives detailed information on application materials, interviewing, negotiating job offers, and starting the new job. This new edition addresses hot topics in the competitive job market of today, including the challenges faced by dual-career couples, job search issues for pregnant candidates, advice on how to deal with gaps in a CV, and advice on seeking postdoctoral opportunities.

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Resources for and about New Faculty

Robert Boice, The New Faculty Member
Boice provides tested solutions for helping new faculty cope with common challenges, outlines a structured mentoring program to build collegiality through social support networks, and presents specific techniques for helping new faculty find time, fluency, and balance as writers, including advice on dealing with editorial evaluations or rejections.

Robert Boice, Advice for New Faculty Members: Nihil Nimus
This book is a unique and essential guide to the start of a successful academic career. By following its practical, easy-to-use rules, new faculty can learn to teach with the highest levels of student approval, involvement, and comprehension, to write with ease, and to socialize more successfully.

Steven M. Cahn, From Student to Scholar: A Candid Guide to Becoming a Professor
Cahn’s advice on the professorial life covers an extensive range of critical issues: how to plan, complete, and defend a dissertation; how to navigate a job interview; how to improve teaching performance; how to prepare and publish research; how to develop a professional network; and how to garner support for tenure. He deals with such hurdles as a difficult dissertation advisor, problematic colleagues, and the pressures of the tenure clock. Whether you are beginning graduate study, hoping to secure an academic position, or striving to build a professorial career, Cahn’s insights are invaluable to traversing the thickets of academia.

Wendy C. Crone, Survive and Thrive: A Guide for Untenured Faculty
The experience of an untenured faculty member is highly dependent on the quality of the mentoring they receive. Mentoring relationships that are driven by the mentee’s needs will be most productive, but often the mentee does not know their own needs, what questions to ask, and what topics they should discuss with a mentor. This book provides a guide to the mentoring process for untenured faculty.

Kenneth A. Feldman and Michael B. Paulsen, Teaching and Learning in the College Classroom, 2nd ed.
This is a broad-based reader designed to increase the awareness and understanding of the most important issues, practices and research associated with the principles of effective teaching and learning in the college classroom. This book should serve as a resource for graduate students, faculty members, administrators, and any others with an interest in higher education.

Heather Fry, Steve Ketteridge, and Stephanie Marshall (eds.), A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: Enhancing Academic Practice, 3rd ed.
This book focuses on developing professional academic skills for teaching. Dealing with the rapid expansion of the use of technology in higher education and widening student diversity, this fully updated and expanded edition includes new material on, the example, e-learning, lecturing to large groups, formative and summative assessment, and supervising research students.

Frank F. Furstenberg, Behind the Academic Curtain: How to Find Success and Happiness with a Ph.D.
Furstenberg offers a clear and user-friendly map to the sometimes overwhelming maze that is life with a Ph.D. From working through graduate school to earning tenure to easing into retirement, from committee work to research funding to managing teaching loads, he illuminates all the challenges and opportunities that define a scholarly life, whether inside or outside of academia. Comprehensive and practical, it is an essential companion for any scholar, at any stage of his or her career.

William Germano, From Dissertation to Book
This book is the essential guide for academic writers who want to revise a doctoral thesis for publication. The author draws upon his extensive experience in academic publishing to provide writers with a state-of-the-art view of how to turn a dissertation into a manuscript that publishers will notice. Building on the idea that revising the dissertation is a process of adapting from one genre to another, Germano offers advice on such topics as rethinking the table of contents, taming runaway footnotes, shaping chapter length, and confronting the limitations of jargon. He also offers timetables to help writers plan their revision schedules.

John A. Goldsmith, John Komlos, and Penny Schine Gold, The Chicago Guide to Your Academic Career: A Portable Mentor for Scholars from Graduate School through Tenure
In this guide, three distinguished scholars—with more than 75 years of combined teaching experience—talk openly about what’s good and what’s not so good about academia, as a place to work and as a way of life. Written as an informal conversation among colleagues, the book is packed with inside information about finding a mentor, making it through the dissertation, getting a job, obtaining tenure, and more.

Paul Gray and David E. Drew, What They Didn’t Teach You in Graduate School: 199 Helpful Hints for Success in Your Academic Career
What is academic life like? How do you discover its tacit rules? Develop the habits and networks needed for success? What issues will you encounter if you’re a person of color, or a woman? How is higher education changing? In 199 succinct, and often humorous but seriously practical hints, Gray and Drew share their combined experience of many years as faculty and (recovering) administrators to offer insider advice—the kind that’s rarely taught or even talked about in graduate school.

James M. Lang, Life on the Tenure Track: Lessons from the First Year
In this fast-paced and lively account of his first year as an Assistant Professor, Lang asks the questions that confront every new faculty member: Will my students like me? Will my teaching schedule allow me time to do research and write? Is anyone still awake in the back row? Lang shares his moments of confusion, frustration, even elation—as well as his insights into the lives and working conditions of faculty in higher education today.

Christopher J Lucas and John W. Murray, Jr., New Faculty: A Practical Guide for Academic Beginners (2 nd ed.)
This fully revised edition of New Faculty offers a useful compendium of “survival” advice for the faculty newcomer on a variety of subjects: classroom teaching, student performance evaluation, grant writing, student advising, professional service, and publishing.

Robert J. Menges and Associates, Faculty in New Jobs: A Guide to Settling In, Becoming Established, and Building Institutional Support
Drawing on a study conducted by researchers at the National Center on Postsecondary Teaching, Learning, and Assessment, Faculty in New Jobs offers practical, real-world advice covering all phases of the faculty career—from the difficult early process of settling in, to becoming socially and academically established, to ultimately building the institutional supports necessary for a successful career.

Robert Rotenberg, The Art & Craft of College Teaching: A Guide for New Professors & Graduate Students
This book provides a hands-on, quick-start guide to the complexities of the college classroom for instructors in their first five years of teaching independently. The chapters survey the existing literature on how to effectively teach young adults, offering specific solutions to the most commonly faced classroom dilemmas.

A. Clay Schoenfeld and Robert Magnan, Mentor in a Manual: Climbing the Academic Ladder to Tenure, 3rd ed.
This professional handbook is designed to help pre-tenure faculty successfully navigate their way up the academic ladder. The authors provide practical advice about broader issues like acquiring an academic frame of mind as well as more specific issues like learning how to assimilate yourself into individual department cultures.

Franklin Silverman, Collegiality and Service for Tenure and Beyond: Acquiring a Reputation as a Team Player
This book is the third in a series of candid handbooks intended to provide assistant professors and graduate students contemplating a career in academia much of the practical information they’ll need to maximize the likelihood of being tenured and promoted to associate professor. This book deals with collegiality and service.

Paul J. Silvia, How to Write a Lot
In this practical, lighthearted, and encouraging book, Paul J. Silvia explains that writing productively does not require innate skills or special traits but specific tactics and actions. Drawing examples from his own field of psychology, he shows readers how to overcome motivational roadblocks and become prolific without sacrificing evenings, weekends, and vacations. After describing strategies for writing productively, the author gives detailed advice from the trenches on how to write, submit, revise, and resubmit articles; how to improve writing quality; and how to write and publish academic work.

Paul Silvia, Write It Up: Practical Strategies for Writing and Publishing Journal Articles
Your academic writing will be more influential if you approach it reflectively and strategically. Based on his experience as an author, journal editor, and reviewer, Paul Silvia offers sage and witty advice on problems like picking journals; cultivating the right tone and style for your article; managing collaborative projects and coauthors; crafting effective Introduction, Method, Results, and Discussion sections; and submitting and resubmitting papers to journals. This book is for anyone writing an empirical article in APA Style, from beginners facing their first article to old dogs looking for new writing strategies.

Emily Toth, Ms. Mentor’s Impeccable Advice for Women in Academia
Ms. Mentor’s readers will find answers to the secret queries they were afraid to ask anyone else. They’ll discover what it really takes to get tenure; what to wear to academic occasions; when to snicker, when to hide, what to eat, and when to sue. They’ll find out how to get firmly planted in the rich red earth of tenure.

Emily Toth, Ms. Mentor’s New and Ever More Impeccable Advice for Women and men in Academia
From the ivory tower that affords her an unparalleled view of the academic landscape, Ms. Mentor dispenses her perfect wisdom to the huddled masses of professorial newbies, hardbitten oldies, and anxious midcareerists. She gives etiquette lessons to academic couples and the tough-talking low-down on adjunct positions. She tells you what to wear, how to make yourself popular, and how to decode academic language.

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